Image of Temple Island
Image of Temple Island
Remenham Parish
Remenham Parish

Thames Valley Police Alerts

Hot Weather and Summer Burglary Prevention Advice

During hot weather spells, only leave windows open for ventilation when you are in the room and lock them when you leave the house and at night. Do not leave windows open, even on upper floors, if they are next to a porch or flat garage roof which can be used to climb up.

If you are working in your garden, please secure any rear or side access doors.

Please do not post on social media channels that you are away from your property.

Regularly check that your garages and sheds are secure.

If you are a landowner, please ensure all gates and access points onto your land are secure.

Please download our free Security Guide for further burglary prevention advice at https://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/police-forces/thames-valley-police/areas/advice/home-security-guide/

If you have any CCTV, video doorbell or dashcam footage that may relate to burglaries in the area or you have seen anything suspicious please report online or call 101.

If you do not want to speak directly to the police you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously and free of charge on 0800 555 111. It is an independent charity, no personal details will be asked for, calls are not recorded or traced and you would not have to go to court.

TVP Update August 2020

Superintendent Felicity Parker, the Police Area Commander for Bracknell Forest and Wokingham Borough, is in the process of developing the Independent Advisory Group (IAG) for Wokingham Borough and would like to connect with people interested in getting involved.

                                

Message from Superintendent Felicity Parker…

 

The purpose of the Independent Advisory Group is to get local people involved in policing.  Members of the IAG are there to bring challenge to me as the leader of the local command area, to provide me with ideas and a steer on how we can better police the area. I can also ask the group for advice when facing any particular issues; whether it being an issue that is of national interest that is putting a spotlight on policing, or something that is affecting the local community. 

The group can help me understand what more I need to do to support residents, younger people, or those in the minority in the community. 

The meetings take place in the evenings, last approximately two hours and are generally every 3 months. 

 

If you are interested in becoming a member of the IAG, there is an application form to complete and then a brief (virtual at the moment) meeting with me to discuss the role further. 

To join the Wokingham IAG, applicants should navigate to the Careers (Join Us) section on the external website - www.thamesvalley.police.uk, then navigate to Roles, Vacancies and then search 'IAG' which is always carrying open vacancies.

 

Contact us

  • Email: You can contact your local neighbourhood team via TwyfordNHPT@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk– please note this email address cannot be used to report crimes or for any urgent matters.
  • Facebook: TVP Bracknell & Wokingham
  • Twitter: @TVP_Wokingham
  • You can receive free information updates from Thames Valley Police by registering for Thames Valley Alert at: www.thamesvalleyalert.co.uk.

Become A Detective With Thames Valley Police

Thames Valley Police is now accepting expressions of interest for the Detective Constable - Degree Holder Entry Programme (DC- DHEP).
Already hold a degree or in the final year of your study? Eager to pursue a career in investigation? Aspire to manage your own investigations from start to finish? Motivated by a desire to do the right thing and get justice for victims?
Typically described as inquisitive, observant, tenacious, methodical, dedicated, resilient, attention to detail oriented with solid research skills combined with confident decision-making? The Detective-DHEP could be for you.
The Detective-DHEP is a rigorous, intensive and demanding two-year fast track to the Detective Constable (DC) entry route. Like the Police Constable-DHEP (PC-DHEP), it is a work-based programme, supported by on and off the job learning.
On successful completion of your probation, you will achieve a Graduate Diploma in Professional Policing Practice plus have acquired the additional PIP2 learning, training and accreditation to qualify you as a Detective Constable. 
The course requires commitment and dedication to both serving the public and meeting the demands of the development programme, whilst offering a fantastic opportunity for you to continue to learn beyond your initial degree and earning a salary as a fully warranted police officer from your first day.
The starting salary for all new recruits is £26,177 (which includes £2,000 South-East allowance). On the current system officers can expect to be earning a salary in excess of £40,000 per annum by your 7th year in the job.
Learn more about the Detective Constable - Degree Holder Entry Programme (DC- DHEP) and how to register your expression of interest here:
https://tvpcareers.co.uk/detectivedhep

Message from Head of Local Policing Chief Superintendent Christian Bunt about Further Easing of Restrictions

After over three months of social restrictions, we understand that people will want to go out and enjoy themselves when lockdown restrictions ease further on Saturday (4/7).

As these restrictions are lifted however, the public have an even greater responsibility to adhere to the government guidance around social distancing and hygiene and play their part in stopping the spread of Coronavirus. Covid-19 still presents a significant threat to public health, as highlighted by the local lockdown seen in Leicester this week, and we must all continue to respect the measures in place to protect lives.

As with any expected busy weekend, Thames Valley Police has a comprehensive plan in place with officers visible in our cities and town centres, as well as extra resources and officers available to respond to any disorder or criminality, wherever they are needed. And whilst we have no powers to enforce social distancing, restrictions around gatherings are still in place and we will break up illegal events and take action against those who organise them.

We are also working with local authorities and licensees to support their plans to manage the number of people out and about. In some areas entry to a bar or restaurant will only be possible if you pre-book a table and not all premises are opening, so if you’ve not pre-booked you may not get entry to anywhere and you may wish to consider this when making your plans. Also make sure to pre-plan your travel and how you are going to get home.

We would also ask that people are mindful of the potential impact they could have on the emergency services and urge people to drink responsibly.

We want everyone to have a great time and enjoy themselves but please stay safe and adhere to the public health measures in place to help stop the spread of Coronavirus.

Please see the latest government guidance on the further easing of restrictions.

Cold Callers and Doorstep Rogue Traders

Thames Valley police have received reports of cold callers in the Wokingham Borough area and this activity could increase due to further lockdown restrictions being lifted this weekend. Doorstep traders call at homes unexpectedly, offering services or goods that residents haven’t asked for. Common types of work offered include pressure washing driveways, tree surgeon services or garden clearance, roof repairs or guttering and driveway work. Genuine reputable tradespeople do not need to find work in this way. Residents who buy goods or pay for work are likely to be targeted again.

Cold Calling can also be a cover for persons planning more serious offences such as Burglary, Car Crime or ‘Bogus Official’ offences such as pretending to be from the Water Board and needing to fix a leak, where entry is gained to a house by deception in order to steal while the occupant is distracted.

If someone does call at your door, please stick to the following advice:
• Don’t agree to any work or sign anything on the spot.
• Don’t feel pressured to buy. It is your home and your right to say ‘No’.
• Don’t ever go to a Bank or Cash point with a trader. Legitimate traders would never do this.
• If you have vulnerable neighbours or family members who could potentially fall victim to these type of fraudulent individuals check in on them and call 101 with suspicious vehicles or individuals.
• If you suspect a crime is in progress, or about to occur please note descriptions and contact police on 999.

Trading Standards can assist you and your neighbours by creating a Cold Calling Zone in your street or area. For more information on how they can help, email tsadvice@westberks.gov.uk

Neighbourhood Watch is a successful crime prevention initiative. Getting together with your neighbours to take action can cut local crime. If you would like information on setting up or joining an established local scheme visit www.ourwatch.org.uk

Please pass on this advice to friends, family members and neighbours who might not receive the neighbourhood alert emails.

Shed and Allotment Security

There has been an increasing number of sheds being broken into on allotments and in residential locations across the Wokingham area. The Priority Crime Team are asking residents to check their shed, garden and allotment security. Allotment Holders may wish to consider removing equipment and items from sheds during this time.

Please follow the below links for further crime prevention advice:
www.thamesvalley.police.uk/cp/crime-prevention/non-residential-burglary/secure-shed-garage/
www.thamesvalley.police.uk/cp/crime-prevention/residential-burglary/protect-your-home-by-protecting-your-garden/

Please report any suspicious incidents, sightings or information by using our online service at: www.thamesvalley.police.uk. We're asking you please to only call 999 if it is an emergency and 101 if it is urgent.

The National Allotment Society has information about the effect of coronavirus on Allotment Holders at: https://www.nsalg.org.uk/news/covid19-information/

If you are looking for information about the government instruction to stay at home and how that may affect you, you'll find guidance on Gov.uk
Information about the police enforcement powers put in place to reduce the spread of the virus can also be found on the Government’s website.

You can visit the NHS website for information and advice about coronavirus.

Increase In Thefts from Motor Vehicles

There have been an increasing number of thefts from motor vehicles across the Wokingham area.

Most car criminals are opportunists. By following the below tips you can help outsmart car thieves and limit their opportunity to steal your valuables or vehicle.

• Don’t tempt thieves – Your mobile phone, coins for the car park, sunglasses, packs of medication or other items that can earn quick cash are irresistible to the opportunist thief. The cost of replacing a window is often much more than that of what’s stolen. And it should go without saying that wallets, handbags, purses and credit cards should never be left in an unattended vehicle. Even an old coat or a plastic bag left behind can tempt a thief.
• Trust locks, not luck – always double check your vehicle is locked and secure.
• Keep keys safe - and out of sight. If you have keyless entry, keep your electronic fob in a signal blocking pouch to help prevent it being scanned.
• Perfect parking - if you have a garage, use it or try to park in a well-lit location.
• Be alarmed – ensure your alarm is active and in working order.
• Sat Nav - would you be lost without it? Remove it and make sure you wipe the sucker mark off the windscreen.
• Your number’s up - number plates can be easily removed, secure them with security screws. If your number plates are stolen, report this to the Police online or contact 101.

Remember - Display and you will pay! Leave it on show, expect it to go!

If you’re looking for information about the government instruction to stay at home and how that may affect you, you'll find guidance on Gov.uk
You can visit the NHS website for information and advice about coronavirus.
Information about the police enforcement powers put in place to reduce the spread of the virus can also be found on the Government’s website.

We're asking you please to only call 999 if it is an emergency and 101 if it is urgent. If you can, use our online services at www.thamesvalley.police.uk

Action Fraud Have Received Reports of Covid19 Related Scams

Please note, this is the second in a series of messages we are sending over the next few days, all relating to the current situation. This email does contain links, please click here for guidance about whether you can trust links in emails.

Action Fraud have received reports of #COVID19 related scams. The majority relate to the online sale of protective items such as facemasks and other items in short supply due to the outbreak, that don't exist..
 
https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/alert/coronavirus-related-fraud-reports

Scam Warning

What scams are we seeing?

The majority of reports are related to online shopping scams where people have ordered protective face masks, hand sanitiser and other products, which have never arrived. Other frauds being reported include ticket fraudromance fraudcharity fraud and lender loan fraud
 

Protection advice

Detailed counter fraud advice is available online, including from ScamsmartActionFraudCIFASTakeFiveCitizens AdviceTrading Standards and the National Cyber Security Centre.
 
Reporting to Action Fraud can be done online at https://www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling  0300 123 2040.

To report offers of financial assistance from HMRC contact phishing@hmrc.gov.uk.

Please Secure Your Bicycle

These 10 tips may help your bike remain safe, secure and not a statistic.

1. Register it
Get your bike security marked and registered at www.bikeregister.com It is a highly effective, visible deterrent to bike thieves. They know that if they are caught with a registered bike, the owner can be traced and they could be arrested.

2. Record it
Remember to record details of your bike such as the frame number (normally found underneath the bike between the pedals or where the back wheel slots in), the BikeRegister number plus any other distinguishing features, and take a photo.

3. Double-lock it
It can take thieves as little as few seconds to cut through some locks, so use two good quality locks, at least one of which is a D-lock.

4. Lock the lot
Lock the frame and both wheels to the cycle parking stand.

5. Secure it
Secure your bike as close to the stand as possible to give any thieves little or no room to manoeuvre.

6. Remove the removable bits
Take parts that are easy to remove with you. Or use locking skewers or nuts which can increase security by securing the bike's components to the frame permanently, making it difficult for thieves to steal detachable parts.

7. Park secure
Lock your bike at recognised secure cycle parking. It should be well lit and covered by CCTV.

8. Remember safety begins at home
Take the same care to lock your bike securely at home as you would on the street.

9. Check ownership
Ask for proof of ownership and check the bike frame number on www.bikeregister.com

10. Act fast
If your bike has been stolen, contact us as soon as possible, give us your frame number, BikeRegister number, a photo and any other details and make sure you update the status on BikeRegister. The sooner we know, the sooner we can act, which might stop it being sold on.
https://stolen-bikes.co.uk can help to spread the word on the theft of your bike and offer you advice to help get it back.
www.findthatbike.co.uk lists adverts for bikes placed on online marketplaces, which you can check frequently to see if yours has been listed for sale.

Have A Say on Policing In Your Area

Would you like to have a say on policing in your area?
We are looking for members of the public to join Independent Advisory Groups (IAGs) across Thames Valley.
 
What is an IAG?
An Independent Advisory Group (IAG) is a way for our community to work directly with the police to improve the way we work and the service you receive.
Meeting four times a year (usually in the evening), the IAG is made up of and chaired by independent members of the public, supported by officers from local policing teams.
IAG members represent the local community, sharing their views on policing issues affecting local people and challenging them when necessary.
 
Who can become an IAG member?
Anyone who lives or works in Thames Valley can join their local IAG.
We encourage people from a variety of backgrounds, ages, races and religions to get involved to ensure the group reflects the diversity of the local community it is representing.
 
How to get involved
If you are interested in shaping the way policing is delivered in your local area and ensuring your community has a voice please visit our website -
www.thamesvalley.police.uk/activecommunities  

Thefts of Catalytic Converters

TVP are seeing a rise in the theft of catalytic converters in and around Bracknell & Wokingham. Thieves are targeting a range of vehicles and specifically Honda Jazz’s in Bracknell. Offenders are using a trolley jack to lift vehicles and then cut away the converters from beneath them, typically wearing hi visibility jackets.

If you see anything suspicious and are able to safely do so, please record details such as registration numbers, type of vehicle and colour of vehicle being used by the offenders. If something does not look or seem right, please do not hesitate to contact us and if you believe a crime is in progress, please call 999.

Try parking your car close to fences, walls or kerbs with the exhaust being closest to the fence, wall or kerb to make the theft more difficult. Avoid parking your vehicle half on the pavement and half on the road, as this may make it easier for thieves to access the catalytic converter.

Rural Crime Action Group RCAG Wokingham

The Rural Crime Action Group (Wokingham) are a group of volunteers and representatives from organisations including Thames Valley Police, Wokingham Borough Council and the National Farmers Union who are passionate about keeping the rural communities safe.

 

Rural crime tends to fall into one of four categories:

  • Agricultural 

Covers working farms, farm machinery, farm buildings and smallholdings. Offences include theft of equipment or fuel, damage to property and livestock worrying. 

  • Equine 

Covers working stables and equestrian centres and includes offences like tack theft and livestock worrying.

  • Wildlife

Includes hare coursing, poaching and interfering with protected species. You can find out more about wildlife crime on our website www.thamesvalley.police.uk

  • Heritage

Defined as 'any offence which harms the value of England's heritage assets and their settings to this and future generations'. This can include offences such as lead theft from churches, damage to ancient monuments and illegal metal detecting.

Rural crime can also fall under environmental crime, which covers illegal waste dumping, fly tipping, polluting watercourses and land.

If you are concerned about rural crime or your own security, a member of the RCAG can visit you and offer security and crime prevention advice for you, your premises or your home. Where, appropriate, assistance is available for those who find themselves in difficult circumstances.

 

You can contact the chair of the RCAG, Hugh Payen, at hugh.payen@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk or contact the Twyford neighbourhood policing team on TwyfordNHPT@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk 

Please note that as a team of volunteers, your enquiry may not receive an immediate response.

 

The RCAG do not respond to incidents of rural crime so please continue to report these on 101, online at www.thamesvalley.police.uk or call 999 in an emergency.

If you have information about crime or anti-social behaviour in your area but you do not want to speak to the police, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111.

Chip and Pin Fraud

Fraudsters are actively targeting residents across Bracknell, Wokingham and surrounding areas, who use either Credit or Debit cards to make payments by way of entering a 4 digit PIN at the point of sale or when withdrawing cash.
Some offenders working in small teams, target female supermarket shoppers, taking note of the PIN as the victim taps it into the keypad at the till. They then follow the victim out into the car park where once the handbag has been placed in the car they distract the victim engaging her in conversation whilst the car is opened and the purse is stolen. On occasions the offenders have then simply gone to an ATM at the same store and withdrawn as much cash as they can from the victims account before fleeing. And all before the victim is aware of the theft.
Other offenders interfere with ATMs (cash machines) using illegal devices that retain a victim’s bank card once it has been entered into the machine whist recording the PIN as the victim taps it into the keypad. The offenders then later retrieve the victims card and use it plus the PIN to obtain cash or purchases.
A recent development to this offence has been by offenders who have targeted individuals trying to pay for parking in such locations as hospital car parks, by using their bank cards. Again the ticket machine is fitted with an illegal device to withhold the victim’s card and then approaching the victim, possibly claiming to be a car park attendant, an offender states the victim should report the incident into the machines intercom, and say the PIN so that the operator at the other end can process their payment. Again the offenders later retrieve the card and use the PIN to withdraw cash from nearby ATMs.

To prevent yourself from becoming a victim of these type of fraudsters remember the Golden Rules of;

  • Never letting anyone see what your PIN is.
  • Never writing your PIN down, and
  • Never saying your PIN out loud, to anyone.


Remeber no one in any bank ever needs to know your PIN,  No Police Officer or other legitimate investigator will ever need to know it, let alone any car park attendant.

KEEP IT SECRET!
 

Please feel free to share this information with family and friends.

Leave A Light on and Burglars In the Dark

 Now that the clocks have gone back and darker evenings are closing in, Thames Valley Police has seen an increase in the number of residential burglaries taking place during the late afternoon and early evening across the Wokingham area. Please be vigilant during the late afternoons and early evenings and report any suspicious people and vehicles in the area. Don’t hesitate to contact the Police on 999 if you see or hear a burglary occurring.

Make your home look occupied at all times. In your absence, lights can be switched on and off by plug in timer sockets or light bulbs with built in light sensors. Alternatively, there are an increasing number of WiFi connective smart systems that enable you to control your lights, central heating and more via a smartphone app from anywhere at any time. If your neighbour has a spare car, ask them to park it on your drive to make it appear that someone is home.

Consider installing a video doorbell system and motion activated lighting to deter intruders as they won’t want to be visible to your neighbours or passing traffic.

Leaving your home checklist
Here’s what we recommend you do before you go out:
• close and double lock all your doors and windows, even if you’re only going out for a few minutes
• make sure any valuables are out of sight
• keep handbags away from letterboxes or cat flaps and hide all keys including car keys, as a thief could hook keys or valuables through even a small opening
• never leave car documents or ID in obvious places such as kitchens or hallways
• in the evening, shut the curtains and leave lights on
• if you’re out all day, it’s advisable to use a timer device to automatically turn lights and a radio on at night
• set your burglar alarm
• make sure all gates are locked
• lock your shed or garage and lock your bike inside to a robust fitting bolted to the ground or wall, like a ground anchor
• consider purchasing a home CCTV or video doorbell system
• don't post on social media that you are away from your home

For more advice on how to keep your home safe, visit our website:
www.thamesvalley.police.uk/advice/protecting-your-home-and-belongings/ 

Victims First Launches Video on Relationship Abuse

Victims First, which supports victims of crime and abuse across Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire, has launched a video to raise awareness of coercive control and emotional abuse in relationships.

The video, ‘Don’t Disappear’ can be viewed here
It highlights the red flags to look out for in a relationship, which can be the warning signs of controlling behaviour and abuse.

Coercive control became a criminal offence in 2015 and involves an act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse by a perpetrator that is used to harm, punish or frighten their victim.

Although many people associate domestic abuse with physical violence, coercive control recognises the damaging impact of other forms of abuse in relationships as well.

‘Don’t Disappear’ follows the story of Jamie and Emma, from the seemingly loving early stages of their relationship, to the development of abusive behaviour.

Although anyone can be a victim of coercive control, ‘Don’t Disappear’ is particularly aimed at younger people who may have less experience of relationships or people who are at the beginning of a relationship, to raise awareness of the red flags which at the time, may be missed or misinterpreted as acceptable behaviour. 

The video covers a range of controlling behaviours exhibited from Jamie to Emma including:

  • Jealousy and possessiveness including accusations of flirting and cheating
  • Isolating her from her family and friends
  • Controlling the use of her phone and social media
  • Constantly checking on her whereabouts
  • Sudden outbursts of anger and mood changes, and
  • Love bombing - showering her with excessive affection and attention in order to retain control 

Both men and women can be victims or perpetrators of coercive control which can take place in heterosexual and same-sex relationships.

Other examples of coercive control include, depriving someone of basic needs, monitoring their time and activities, taking control over aspects of their everyday life such as where they can go or who they can see, humiliating, degrading or dehumanising someone, controlling their finances and making threats or intimidating behaviour.

You can view Don’t Disappear at https://youtu.be/d6rt8w5HBWw

Victims First is managed by the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) for Thames Valley and provides support to anyone impacted by any type of crime or abusive.

If you have been affected by coercive control or domestic abuse you can access support through Victims First on 0300 1234 148 or online at www.victims-first.org.uk.

Supermarket Car Park Distraction Thieves

Thames Valley Police have received several reports of shoppers being targeted by “supermarket car park distraction thieves”. These thieves often prey on shoppers who enter supermarkets with a shoulder or handbag. They follow the victim through the store and stay close by as they enter their PIN number at the till. Having obtained the PIN number, two or more of the thieves follow the victim and wait until the victim has loaded their shopping and handbag into their vehicle. They then approach and as one engages the victim in conversation another thief quietly and unnoticed opens a car door and steals the handbag/wallet. Once the victim drives away the thieves often use the stolen bank card and PIN to withdraw cash from a local ATM.

To reduce the risk of becoming a victim, ensure that whenever you use a “Chip and Pin card” that you cover the key pad as you enter the 4 digit number so that no one can see/record it. Make sure your handbag and wallet are secure at all times.
 
If you have any information or would like to report a crime, please visit www.thamesvalley.police.uk or call the police non-emergency number 101.

If you do not want to speak directly to the police you can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or online at www.crimestoppers-uk.org

Please encourage your friends, family and neighbours to receive these types of messages by registering at www.thamesvalleyalert.co.uk

Van Security

Criminals often target vans parked in areas such as hotel, supermarket and retail outlet car parks.
 
Follow these simple steps to help protect your tools:
 
Mark your tools
Take a photo of the serial number or identifying marks
Use a unique tamperproof sticker
Engrave tools with your initials or a memorable word
Use an ultraviolet pen
Remember to mark your batteries, too
 
Register your tools
Register your tools and serial numbers on a national property recording database such as Immobilise.
 
Secure your vehicle
Make sure your vehicle is locked with the windows shut when it’s left unattended. Even if you are popping back and forth to grab tools, criminals only need a moment to empty your van.

Empty your van
Where possible, empty your van of your tools overnight – don’t give criminals the opportunity to empty your van for you.
 
Install a dashcam or CCTV
Consider purchasing a dash cam or CCTV camera to deter criminals from targeting your van. Alarms are also good deterrents if one is not already fitted.
 
Park against a wall
Where possible, park your van overnight in a busy, well-lit area backed against or alongside a wall to make it difficult to gain access to the back of your van.
 
Use extra locks or cages
Consider purchasing dead locks or slam locks to further secure your vehicle. Security cages can also be installed inside your van so that even if someone gains access, they still can’t get to your tools.

Thefts of Outboard Motors

Warning to boat-owners to be vigilant following thefts of outboard motors in the area.

If you have any information, please report online at https://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/
or alternatively, contact the Thames Valley Police non-emergency number 101.

If you do not want to speak directly to the police you can contact the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or online at www.crimestoppers-uk.org No personal details are taken, information is not traced or recorded and you will not go to court.

Fraudsters Targeting Social Media Influencers

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has received intelligence to suggest that fraudsters are contacting social media influencers, based in the UK and abroad, offering them the opportunity to market a bogus product, service or investment opportunity.

Fraudsters will present professional and credible pitches to the social media influencers and try to convince them to feature the opportunity for a fee on their social media profiles in order to entice unsuspecting followers of the influencer to sign up or make a purchase.

Additionally, fraudsters are using the names of well-known public figures, implying that their opportunity or product is endorsed by the figure when it is not.

The public should be aware that any apparent endorsement by celebrities, influencers or personalities does not necessarily mean that an investment, product or service is genuine. The public is urged to exercise a cautious approach to any such offer of investment, product or service with the same caution they would at any other time.

What You Need To Do

  • If you are purchasing goods from a company you don’t know and trust, carry out some research first, or ask friends or family for advice before completing a purchase.
  • Professional-looking websites, adverts or social media posts do not guarantee that an investment opportunity or product is genuine. Criminals can exploit the names of well-known brands or individuals to make them appear legitimate.
  • Avoid paying for goods or services by bank transfer unless you know and trust the person or company. Payments via bank transfer offer you no protection if you become a victim of fraud. Instead, use your credit card or payment services such as PayPal as they offer you greater protection if you become a victim of fraud.

Drivers Targeted With Fake Fines

Action Fraud have received an increase in reports and intelligence where elderly victims are being targeted by individuals purporting to be police officers or traffic wardens. The victims are being approached whilst parked in a car park and are told by the suspect that they have parked illegally or broken a speed limit and a photo has been taken of their car for ‘evidence’.

Victims are advised that they will face a substantial penalty fine unless they pay a smaller upfront fee immediately. Victims, who opt for paying the smaller penalty, will be directed to a parking meter and asked to enter their card and PIN. These parking meters have been tampered with by the suspect in order to retain the card.

Once the victim inserts their card and are asked for their PIN, the victims are shoulder surfed for their PIN by the suspect. Once victims input their PIN, the card is retained by the machine and victims are told by the suspect to seek help from the company who operates the parking meter or their bank.

What you need to do

  • If you are suspicious about the authenticity of the fine, do not pay it until you have verified it with your local council.
  • Always shield your PIN from view when using an ATM machine, andnever share your PIN with anyone.
  • If your bank card is retained by an ATM machine, contact your bankimmediately to inform them.

Courier Fraud Alert

Courier Fraud, Bogus Police and Bank Officials Alert
What you need to know

Individuals have been receiving phone calls from people claiming to be a police officer or banking official

The suspect will say either: 

  • There has been fraudulent activity at the victim’s bank and the staff at the bank are involved, the victim is then asked to withdraw money to either keep it safe or assist the police with their investigation
  • A business such as a jewellers or currency exchange is fraudulent and they require the victim's assistance to help secure evidence by purchasing jewellery or exchange a large amount of currency to hand over to the police
  • The victim's card has been compromised and used to purchase goods by a suspect, the victim is requested to withdraw their money to keep it safe or hand over their bank card to the police
  • Occasionally the victim will be told to dial a non-emergency extension of ‘161’ to receive confirmation of the individual’s bogus identity, the bogus official will advise the victim to lie about the reason for the withdrawal or purchase if challenged by staff, as the staff member is involved in the fraud
  • A courier attends the victim’s home address to collect the goods the same day, often the victim is given a code word for the courier as a way of authentication


What you need to do

Your bank or the police will never:

  • Phone and ask you for your PIN or full banking password
  • Ask you to withdraw money to hand over to them for safe-keeping
  • Ask you to transfer money out of your account
  • Send someone to your home to collect cash, PINs, cards to cheque books

Tree Surgeon Cold Caller

We have received two reported incidents in the Woodley area of a cold caller claiming to be a tree surgeon. In one incident, the man claimed to be from the council and in the other from Neighbourhood Watch, but this has not been the case.

Remember, any legitimate tradesman calling at your door should not make you feel uneasy. If you feel threatened in any way please call 999.

Please protect yourself from Doorstop Crime and Rogue Traders:
• If you are not sure then please don’t open the door.
• Use a door chain to check who is calling and ask for ID.
• Ask a trusted friend or family member for advice on reputable traders.
• Always report any suspicious activity. You can report it online at www.thamesvalley.police.uk or call 101.

HM Revenue And Customs Alert

What you need to know
Action Fraud has experienced an increase in the reporting of malicious calls, voicemails, text messages or emails to members of the public purporting to be from HMRC.

The fraudsters state that as a result of their non-payment of tax or other duty, the victim is liable to prosecution or other legal proceedings such as repossession of belongings to settle the balance but can avoid this by arranging for payment to be made immediately by method such as bank transfer or by iTunes gift cards.

If the victim is hesitant or refuses to comply, the suspect makes a threat such as immediate arrest, bailiffs or in cases where the victim appears to be of overseas origin; deportation.

Often, the period for which the tax is allegedly due is distant enough to guarantee the victim will have little, if any, paperwork or ability to verify the claims. Once the money is paid the suspects sever all contact.

It is vital that the public exercise caution when receiving messages or telephone calls of this nature.

What you need to do
Always question unsolicited requests for your personal or financial information. Just because someone knows your basic details (such as your name and contact details), it doesn't mean they are genuine. Instead, contact the company directly using trusted methods such as a known email address or phone number.

Listen to your instincts. If something feels wrong then it is usually right to question it. No genuine organisation will ask you to pay taxes, bills or fees using iTunes Gift Cards, or any other type of voucher.

Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision. Under no circumstances would a genuine bank or some other trusted organisation force you to make a financial transaction on the spot.

Report Phishing attempts. If you receive a call, text or email of this nature and have not lost money, report this as a phishing attempt to Action Fraud.

Extortion Scam

Cyber criminals send victims their own passwords in extortion scam

Cyber criminals are attempting to blackmail unsuspecting victims by claiming to have used the victims' password to install spying malware on the victims' computer. The criminals claim they’ve recorded videos of the victim watching adult material by activating their webcam when they visit these websites. What makes this scam so convincing is that the email usually includes a genuine password the victim has used for one of their online accounts. We believe criminals obtain the passwords from data breaches.

What to do if you get one of these emails?

Don’t reply to the email, or be pressured into paying. The police advise that you do not pay criminals. Try flagging the email as spam/junk if you receive it multiple times. Perform a password reset as soon as possible on any accounts where you’ve used the password mentioned in the email. Always use a strong, separate password for important accounts, such as your email. Where available, enable two-factor authentication (2FA). Always install the latest software and app updates. Install, or enable, anti-virus software on your laptops and computers and keep it updated.

If you receive one of these emails, report it to Action Fraud’s phishing reporting tool. If you have received one of these emails and paid the ransom, report it to your local police force.

How To Keep The Cyber-Criminals Out

Scam Alert - Fake Netflix Emails

We’ve seen an increase in reports about fake Netflix emails claiming that there’s an issue with your account, or that your account has been suspended. The email states that you need to “update” your account details in order to resolve the problem. The link in the emails leads to genuine-looking Netflix phishing websites designed to steal your username and password, as well as payment details.

Always question unsolicited requests for your personal or financial information in case it’s a scam. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text.

For more information on how to stay secure online, visit www.cyberaware.gov.uk 

Scam Alert - Fake British Gas Emails

We’ve had an increase in reports about fake British Gas emails claiming to offer refunds. The links provided in the emails lead to genuine-looking British Gas phishing websites that are designed to steal the usernames and passwords for British Gas accounts.

Always question unsolicited requests for your personal or financial information in case it’s a scam. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text.

For more information on how to stay secure online, visit www.cyberaware.gov.uk

Watchout For These Fake Linkedin Emails

We’ve received multiple reports about these fake LinkedIn emails. They claim that your LinkedIn profile has appeared in multiple searches and provide links you can click on to get more details. These links lead to malicious websites designed to steal your personal and financial details.

Always question unsolicited requests for your personal or financial information in case it’s a scam. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text.

Alert - Rise In Fake Amazon Emails

These fake emails are after your Amazon login details!

We’ve had an increased number of reports about these fake emails purporting to be from Amazon. The subject line and content of the emails vary, but they all contain links leading to phishing websites designed to steal your Amazon login details.

Always question unsolicited requests for your personal or financial information in case it’s a scam. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text.​​​​​​​

Watch Out For These Fake Texts About Your Ee Bill

What you need to know about phishing

Importance of Dog Microchipping

Having your dog microchipped can make a lot of difference when looking for and trying to identify a missing dog.

 

Since April 2016 it has been a legal requirement for all dogs to be microchipped by 8 weeks of age.

 

Each microchip has a unique number that must be registered on a Government approved database along with information about your dog and you as its owner. If your dog is not registered on one of these databases you can be fined.

 

It is important that the information is kept up-to-date so that if your dog does go missing, you can be contacted at the correct phone number or address.

 

Reporting it to the police as soon as possible is also important, including making us aware of the microchip number so we can record this on our database. This will make it easier for us to identify any dogs that are found and check to see if they have been reported as missing or stolen.

 

It is also recommended to record the loss or theft of your dog online using sites dedicated to finding lost and stolen dogs. Often these sites work with police and other organisations, such as local Neighbourhood Watch Groups and Vetinary practices, to try and find them.

 

More information on microchipping your dog can be found on the Governmentwebsite.

 

In 2016, the Dogs Trust recorded that 9,000 stray dogs were reunited with their owners due to having a microchip with up-to-date details.

 

The People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) also reported that in 2017, 11% of dog owners did not realise that it was a requirement by law to have their dog microchipped and a further 7% had not updated their details when they needed to.

Assistance for vulnerable missing people - Herbert Protocol

A new tool to help find missing people with dementia was launched earlier this week in partnership with search and rescue teams across the Thames Valley.

The Herbert Protocol is a form to record key information about a person with dementia. This should be completed by carers or family members in case they go missing. 

Memory problems are one of a number of symptoms that people with dementia may experience, this can lead to feelings of confusion, fear and vulnerability and consequently can result in a person going missing.

Adopting the Herbert Protocol will help to ensure that the police and partner agencies, including the volunteer search and rescue teams, have the best possible information should someone with dementia go missing and a search needs to be conducted to find them.

It will help avoid any unnecessary delays as the right information is immediately available. The form may include if the person is on medication, favourite places they like to visit or key people they know.

Det Supt Nick John, Head of Protecting Vulnerable People, said: “The Herbert Protocol seeks to reduce the harm suffered by people living with dementia who go ‘missing’ by ensuring that the information needed is readily available to help inform the risk assessment and the search by the police and partner agencies, including the volunteer search and rescue teams.  I would strongly urge carers, whether family members, private carers, or care home staff, to adopt the protocol by completing the Herbert Protocol form in advance.”

Download the form and find out more information about the Herbert Protocol.

Fake Government Grants Fraud Alert

Individuals and businesses are being warned to watch out for cold calls and online contact from fraudsters who are offering victims the opportunity to apply for Government grants for an advance fee.

 

To make the grants look legitimate fraudsters have set up bogus companies and convincing looking websites that claim to be operating on behalf of the UK Government.

 

Fraudsters cold call businesses and individuals offering the grant and if they’re interested direct them to fill out an online application form with their personal information.

Once the fraudsters have that information they’ll contact back victims and congratulate them on being accepted onto the grant programme.   
 

Pre-paid credit cards

 

Applicants are then asked to provide identification and are instructed to get a pre-paid credit card to deposit their own contribution to the fake Government grant scheme. Fraudsters will then contact victims on the phone or are emailed and asked for the details of their pre-paid credit card and copies of statements to in order for them to add the grant funds.

 

Of course the grant funds are never given by the fraudsters and the money that’s been loaded by the victim onto the card is stolen.

 

If you receive one of these calls, hang up immediately and report it to us. We’ve already taken down one website fraudsters have been using to commit this fraud and are working with Companies House to combat this issue.

 

How to protect yourself:

 

Be wary of unsolicited callers implying that you can apply for grants. You should never have to pay to receive a government grant, and they definitely won’t instruct you to obtain a pre-paid credit card. The government should have all the information they need if a genuine grant application was submitted, therefore any requests for personal or banking information either over the phone or online should be refused.

 

What to do if you’re a victim: 
 

  • If you think your bank or personal details have been compromised or if you believe you have been defrauded contact your bank immediately.
  • Stop all communication with the ‘agency’ but make a note of their details and report it to Action Fraud.
  • If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040. 
     

The information contained within this alert is based on information from gathered by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB).  The purpose of this alert is to increase awareness of this type of fraud. The alert is aimed at members of the public, local police forces, businesses and governmental agencies.

Pet - Fraud Alert

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have recently noticed a rise in the reporting of pets, and in particular puppies and kittens, being advertised for sale via popular online auction websites. The fraudsters will place an advert of the pet for sale, often claiming that the pet is currently held somewhere less accessible or overseas. Upon agreement of a sale, the suspect will usually request an advance payment by money transfer or bank transfer. However, the pet does not materialise and the fraudster will subsequently ask for further advanced payments for courier charges, shipping fees and additional transportation costs. Even if further payments are made, the pet will still not materialise as it is likely to not exist.
 

Tips to staying safe when purchasing pets:
 

  • Stay within auction guidelines.
  • Be cautious if the seller initially requests payment via one method, but later claims that due to ‘issues with their account’ they will need to take the payment via an alternative method such as a bank transfer.
  • Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller, for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated with the number/email address online. 
  • Request details of the courier company being used and consider researching it.
  • Agree a suitable time to meet face-to-face to agree the purchase and to collect the pet. If the seller is reluctant to meet then it could be an indication that the pet does not exist.
  • A genuine seller should be keen to ensure that the pet is going to a caring and loving new home. If the seller does not express any interest in you and the pet’s new home, be wary.
  • If you think the purchase price is too good to be true then it probably is, especially if the pet is advertised as a pure-breed.
  • Do not be afraid to request copies of the pet’s inoculation history, breed paperwork and certification prior to agreeing a sale. If the seller is reluctant or unable to provide this information it could be an indication that either the pet does not exist or the pet has been illegally bred e.g. it originates from a ‘puppy farm’. A ‘puppy farm’ is a commercial dog breeding enterprise where the sole aim is to maximise profit for the least investment. Commercial dog breeders must be registered with their local authority and undergo regular inspections to ensure that the puppies are bred responsibly and are in turn fit and healthy. Illegally farmed puppies will often be kept in inadequate conditions and are more likely to suffer from ailments and illnesses associated with irresponsible breeding.
  • When thinking of buying a pet, consider buying them in person from rescue centres or from reputable breeders.
  • If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting  www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Vehicle Online Shopping Fraud

Fraudsters have been advertising vehicles and machinery for sale on various selling platforms online. The victims, after communicating via email with the fraudster, will receive a bogus email which purports to be from an established escrow provider (a third party who will keep the payment until the buying and selling parties are both happy with the deal).

These emails are designed to persuade victims to pay upfront, via bank transfer, before visiting the seller to collect the goods. The emails also claim that the buyer (victim) has a cooling off period to reclaim the payment if they change their mind. This gives victims the false sense of security that their money is being looked after by this trustworthy third party, when in fact it is not and the money has gone straight to the fraudster. 

Protect yourself:

  • When making a large purchase such as a new car or machinery, always meet the seller face to face first and ask to see the goods before transferring any money.
  • If you receive a suspicious email asking for payment, check for spelling, grammar, or any other errors, and check who sent the email. If in doubt, check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller.
  • Contact the third party the fraudsters are purporting to be using to make the transaction. They should be able to confirm whether the email you have received is legitimate or not.
  • False adverts often offer vehicles or machinery for sale well below market value to entice potential victims; always be cautious. If it looks too good to be true then it probably is.

If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visitingwww.actionfraud.police.uk, or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Warning - pre-recorded prank calls

There has been a recent rise of prank calls within Thames Valley. 
 The calls are pre-recorded generated responses giving the impression that recipients are actually speaking directly to someone.
 The calls are not all the same. However one of the main scenarios has been described as an angry Scottish man claiming you are stealing his Wi-Fi. 
 Sometimes there is a mobile phone number showing and other times the number is withheld. 
 It appears that these calls are predominantly targeting elderly and young people and can cause alarm and distress to the call taker.  

We urge people to take the following advice: 
 

  • Anyone with particular concerns can contact us on our Police non-emergency number 101. Otherwise ignore the call.
  • You can contact your local phone provider who may be able to put a block on these types of calls.
  • If you are getting calls at night you could put your phone on night mode or switch it off. 

River levels webcam

Church Services

SERVICES IN AUGUST 2020

 

Sunday 9  August

11.15am Holy Communion (BCP)

 

Sunday 16 August

11.15am Matins (BCP)

 

Sunday 23 August

11.15am Holy Communion (BCP)

 

Sunday 30 August

11.15am Matins (BCP)

 

We are  observing social distancing during services

 and cleaning protocols etc are in place in church.  

From Sunday 9 August you will need to wear a mask in church.

Website Statistics

July 2020

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Total for 2019

23,107 unique visitors

67,374 pages viewed

 

Total for 2018

12,954 unique visitors 

48,218 pages viewed

 

Total for 2017

11,363 unique visitors 

35,942 pages viewed

 

Total for 2016 

10,546 unique visitors

30,430 pages viewed

Remenham Footpath Maps

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